Who Is This For

Who Is This For

Zeke pushed the bucket along with his foot. It scraped over a divet  and the liquid inside slopped over and covered his boots and the cement, but Zeke just ignored it. He was too busy hanging the poster in his hands and slathering it with glue to keep it in place to care. It also wasn’t the first time such a thing had happened, and he wasn’t inclined to worry as he’d been told to be prodigious in his use of the stuff. That and there were 20 other posters he had plastered on the very same wall.

Neatness wasn’t called for. Quick, dirty, effective work - that was the idea behind the whole campaign. Or Zeke assumed that as he slapped more glue on the concrete wall covering bit of graffiti that was there already. After all, who puts up posters for a drone. Someone, somewhere at a marketing firm had decided a street level campaign was the best way to get people excited for the thing.

What wasn’t clear to Zeke as he posted his two-hundredth odd ad was what the drone was for. It looked… cool-ish, but didn’t have any discernible functions he could figure out. He still went about placing the posters on every exposed wall and surface he could for blocks. As he thought about it, may the only purpose of the campaign was to normalize the drones, to get use to accept them as part of the city’s sights.

A lot of Zeke’s friends had reacted poorly to the first ones to roll out to the public. The little six wheeled delivery drones that ran errands for companies were always tripping people up. Zeke fell on them during rush hour on at least three occasions. The things were just so short that they were too easy to miss. Granted he’d been on his phone, but still. The things should make way for people, not the other way around.

Zeke eventually got used to them and would try to play a game with the drones. He’d place his bucket on one as it rolled down the street. Then he’d try to plaster as many posters as he could before the thing rolled on to the next block and took his bucket. He got more glue on the delivery drone than the walls and the posters were haphazard at best. But he thought that made them look more authentic.

He doubted these new drones would allow for such fun. But all he could do was wait and see, and keep placing more posters.


Today’s art is courtesy of Daniel Hahn from Los Angeles, USA.

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Somethings Are Universal

Somethings Are Universal